May 2010


9780375842207THE BOOK THIEF
by Markus Zusak

To request a complimentary examination copy to review for classroom use, please contact us at K12education@edu.penguinrandomhouse.com or call us toll free at (844) 851-3955.

It is 1939. Nazi Germany. The country is holding its breath. Death has never been busier, and will become busier still.

Liesel Meminger is a foster girl living outside of Munich, who scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist–books. With the help of her accordion-playing foster father, she learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement. (more…)

9780385721813WHEN THE EMPEROR WAS DIVINE
by Julie Otsuka

To request a complimentary examination copy to review for classroom use, please contact us at K12education@edu.penguinrandomhouse.com or call us toll free at (844) 851-3955.

Julie Otsuka’s commanding debut novel paints a portrait of the Japanese-American internment camps unlike any we have seen. With crystalline intensity and precision, Otsuka uses a single family to evoke the deracination—both physical and emotional —of a generation of Japanese Americans. Spare, intimate, arrestingly understated, When the Emperor Was Divine is a haunting evocation of a family in wartime and an unmistakably resonant lesson for our times.

“Exceptional. . . . Otsuka skillfully dramatizes a world suddenly foreign. . . . [Her] incantatory, unsentimental prose is the book’s greatest strength.” —The New Yorker (more…)

the wondrous workings of planet earthTHE WONDROUS WORKINGS OF PLANET EARTH
Understanding Our World and Its Ecosystems
by Rachel Ignotofsky

Forthcoming September 18, 2018

Beautifully combining art and science, The Wondrous Workings of Planet Earth is an illustrated tour of the planet that reveals ecosystems large and small, from reefs, deserts, and rainforests to ponds, backyard gardens, and even a drop of water. Through exquisite drawings, maps, and infographics, New York Times best-selling author Rachel Ignotofsky makes earth science accessible and entertaining, explaining how our planet works, from its diverse ecosystems and their inhabitants, to the levels of ecology, the importance of biodiversity, the carbon cycle, weather cycles, and more. A perfect primer for students, this is an utterly charming and educational guide to the world we live in.

To request a complimentary examination copy to review for classroom use, please contact us at K12education@edu.penguinrandomhouse.com or call us toll free at (844) 851-3955.

Also by Rachel Ignotofsky:

9781607749769

WOMEN IN SCIENCE
50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World

From the ancient to the modern world, Women in Science highlights the contributions of fifty notable women to the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Full of striking, singular art, this new collection also contains infographics about relevant topics such as lab equipment, rates of women currently working in STEM fields, and an illustrated scientific glossary. The trailblazing women profiled include well-known figures like primatologist Jane Goodall, as well as lesser-known pioneers such as Katherine Johnson, the African-American physicist and mathematician who calculated the trajectory of the 1969 Apollo 11 mission to the moon.

Women in Science celebrates the achievements of the intrepid women who have paved the way for the next generation of female engineers, biologists, mathematicians, doctors, astronauts, physicists, and more.

Also available are a number of classroom-friendly Women in Science materials, including a puzzle, postcards, and a science-themed journal.

how to argue with a catHOW TO ARGUE WITH A CAT
A Human’s Guide to the Art of Persuasion
by Jay Heinrichs 
Illustrated by Natalie Palmer-Sutton

To request a complimentary examination copy to review for classroom use, please contact us at K12education@edu.penguinrandomhouse.com or call us toll free at (844) 851-3955.

Jay Heinrichs, author of Thank You for Arguing and Word Hero, has introduced the art of rhetoric to a whole new generation of young people. With humor and intelligence, Heinrichs continues his work with How to Argue with a Cat. Through its spotlight on the cat, nature’s least persuadable animal, the book is an accessible and fun primer to an art that gives a shy person a voice, brings groups together, and inoculates them against the more nefarious kinds of manipulation. Students will learn the secrets to debating without fear; using body language, tone, and gesture to heighten the delivery of their argument; and to think about what their opponent wants, no matter how cat-like they may be.

Letter to My Daughter by George Bishop

by George Bishop, author of Letter to My Daughter: A Novel

In my novel Letter to My Daughter, Laura, a middle-aged mother, writes a long letter to her runaway daughter.  Early on in the story, she bemoans the fact that letter writing seems to be a dying art:  “In this hyperactive age of emails and text messages, the kind of correspondence that Tim [her boyfriend] and I shared must seem like an anachronism to you . . . But I sincerely hope, dear Elizabeth, that someday you might have the pleasure of such an anachronism; that one day you’ll experience for yourself the irreplaceable joy of receiving letters from a lover.”  Much like my protagonist, I too appreciate the value of letters as a form of communication, and for this reason I’m always looking for ways to incorporate letter-writing activities in my English classes. 

Unlike an electronic message, a letter’s a tangible thing; it’s got heft and substance.  We can hold it in our hands, turn it over, smell it even.  We appreciate the extra time it took the sender to write out their thoughts on paper, put the paper in an envelope, address, stamp, and mail it.  A letter says, Listen to me.  I’ve got something important to tell you. (more…)

Mindset by Carol S. Dweck

In this week’s Chronicle of Higher Education, staff reporter David Glenn has written an interesting piece considering the pioneering work—and controversial viewpoints—of psychologist, professor and author Carol Dweck. The National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) took note of this article and linked to it in their weekly INBOX e-newsletter, sent out today.

Dweck, currently a professor at Stanford University, is a leading expert on motivation and personality psychology.  Having done more than twenty years of research on mindset, she has come to form what many consider to be a contrarian view: by fostering the belief that intelligence is a fixed trait, and praising students for simply “being smart”, educators do a disservice not only to students but to society-at-large.

The article has sparked varied reactions among Chronicle readers.  In exchange for a free copy of Dweck’s book Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, we’d like to get your point of view as well.  Simply read the Chronicle article and/or the book excerpt and post a thoughtful comment here.  Then email us for your free copy (please be sure to include your full school mailing address).

It’s that time of year—diploma in hand, graduates everywhere are celebrating their achievements as they move on to the next exciting stage in their lives. From practical how-to guides to inspiring tales of overcoming adversity, these books are ideal and meaningful gifts for any new graduate.

 

Interested in reviewing any of these titles? Please contact us at prheducation@gmail.com or call us toll free at (844) 851-3955.

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