November 2011


under pressureUNDER PRESSURE
Confronting the Epidemic of Stress and Anxiety in Girls
by Lisa Damour, Ph.D.

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Research finds that the number of girls who said that they often felt nervous, worried, or fearful jumped 55 percent from 2009 to 2014, while the comparable number for adolescent boys has remained unchanged. As a clinical psychologist who specializes in working with girls, Lisa Damour, Ph.D. has written Under Pressure, an urgently needed guide to this alarming phenomenon.

Under Pressure provides striking insight into the inner workings of the anxious mind. Filled with tips for any parent, educator, or person interested in helping our girls live and perform up to their potential, this book is a go-to guide for understanding and dealing with stress and anxiety in girls.” —Sian Beilock, president of Barnard College at Columbia University and author of Choke

Read an excerpt

Also by Lisa Damour, Ph.D.: Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions into Adulthood

Lisa Damour, Ph.D., is the New York Times bestselling author of Untangled, as well as numerous academic papers related to education and child development. She graduated with honors from Yale University, worked for the Yale Child Study Center, then received her doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of Michigan. Dr. Damour is the executive director of Laurel School’s Center for Research on Girls, maintains a private psychotherapy practice, consults and speaks internationally, and is a senior advisor to the Schubert Center for Child Studies at Case Western Reserve University. She and her husband have two daughters and live in Shaker Heights, Ohio.

Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford

I knew that my novel, Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, was making its way onto high school reading lists when curious emails began popping up in my inbox. They tended to go something like this:

“Um, you know, your book, Motel on the Corner of Sweet and Sour—dude, it’s like m favorite novel of all time!! And I’m kinda wondering if you could, like, answer these twelve questions for me? (In my mind, I always hear this question coming from a nasally, voice-cracking, pre-pubescent 14-year-old boy wearing a Hot Topic hoodie with his ear buds in, listening to “Bring Me the Horizon”).

And just like that, I was suddenly someone’s homework. Right up there with Of Mice and Men, the Pythagorean Theorem, and building dioramas out of old shoe-boxes and craftpaper.

To be honest, I wasn’t entirely sure how my novel would be received.

So then I asked myself why so many students embrace books like The Catcher in the Rye and To Kill a Mockingbird—because they’re amazing novels? Sure. But moreover, these are books with young protagonists. They offer voices that are readily absorbed by the intrepid imaginations of young adults. (more…)