In November 2017, Penguin Random House hosted members of the Science Supervisors Association of New York City for a special luncheon. The day’s programming included keynote addresses from two of our authors: Andy Weir (The Martian, Artemis) and Rachel Swaby (Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science—and the World). Click below to watch videos of their speeches. (more…)

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teachereventCOVERCalling all Tri-State Area Educators! You are invited to the Penguin Random House Seventh Annual Author Event for NYC Educators. Please RSVP as soon as possible to reserve your spot; space for this event fills up quickly!

Held at the Random House building in midtown Manhattan on Monday, October 12th from 1-4pm, the event will feature nine authors who will each discuss and sign free copies of their book.

The featured authors are: Ian Doescher, Shakespeare’s Star Wars series; Dana Alison Levy, The Misadventures of the Family Fletcher; David Lubar, Sophomores and Other Oxymorons; Naomi Novik, Uprooted; Robert Repino, Mort(e); Kaitlin Roig-DeBellis, Choosing Hope; Lance Rubin, Denton Little’s Deathdate; Jon Scieszka, Frank Einstein series & Guys Read/Guys Listen; Rachel Swaby, Headstrong; and Clive Thompson, Smarter Than You Think.

Click here for the official invitation. Click here to RSVP.

Questions? Email teacherevent@penguinrandomhouse.com.

9780553446791By Rachel Swaby, author of Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science—And the World (Broadway Books, April 2015)

A programmer examines a computer as massive as a room and finds the first computer bug—a moth stuck in the machine’s relays. A 10-year old is hunting for treasure and discovers a Dinosaur skeleton. Hidden in a pile of data, a woman finds the inner core of the earth, another reveals nuclear fission, and another spots evidence of continental drift in the ocean floor. Who are these incredible scientists? Most of us can’t even name one.

I wrote Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science—And the World to help reveal the hidden history of women in STEM fields. The desire to write these stories was three-pronged. First, I was dismayed at the way women in science were being covered. When the New York Times obituary for the rocket scientist Yvonne Brill started with, “She made a mean beef stroganoff,” I was as disappointed as the rest of the internet. I wanted to rewrite Yvonne Brill’s profile and find a way to more appropriately honor the exceptional work of other women in science. (more…)