184612_weir_andyBy Gillian King-Cargile, STEM Read Director, Northern Illinois University

To request a complimentary examination copy of The Martian or Artemis to review for classroom use, please contact us at K12education@edu.penguinrandomhouse.com or call us toll free at (844) 851-3955.

Click here to listen to the podcast Gillian recorded with Andy Weir at the Argonne National Laboratory.

Over the summer, I had the opportunity to be Andy Weir’s interviewer and native guide on a week-long, whirlwind tour of Chicago and northern Illinois. Andy was the keynote speaker at the International Society for Technology in Education Conference (ISTE). He also entertained and enlightened listeners at STEM Read’s after-hours professional development party for teachers, a talk at Google’s Chicago headquarters, and a series of talks and tours at Argonne National Laboratory. (more…)

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the wondrous workings of planet earthRachel Ignotofsky’s The Wondrous Workings of Planet Earth: Understanding Our World and Its Ecosystems presents an expansive and beautifully illustrated tour of our planet, exploring ecosystems large and small, from reefs, deserts, and rainforests to a single drop of water.  Making earth science accessible and entertaining through art, maps, and infographics, this newly published Ten Speed Press book explains how our planet works—from its diverse ecosystems and their inhabitants, to the levels of ecology, the importance of biodiversity, and the cycles of nature.

In this special interview with author and illustrator Rachel Ignotofsky, she walks us through her creative process, what inspired her content strategy, themes and objectives, working with her editor and the Ten Speed Press design and production team, and how she hopes readers of all ages will become empowered to help preserve and protect earth’s natural resources. 

To request a complimentary examination copy to review for classroom use, please contact us at K12education@edu.penguinrandomhouse.com or call us toll free at (844) 851-3955. (more…)

the classBy Heather Won Tesoriero, author of The Class (Ballantine Books, September 2018)

To request a complimentary examination copy to review for classroom use, please contact us at K12education@edu.penguinrandomhouse.com or call us toll free at (844) 851-3955.

In the fall of 2015, I was a producer for the CBS Evening News. We were planning to do an endpiece for the show about Olivia Hallisey, a Greenwich, CT, teenager who won the Google Science Fair with her invention of a cheap, rapid test for Ebola. Since I spent my first three years out of college teaching, I raised my hand to produce the piece. I thought it would be fun to spend a day back in a high school classroom.

What I didn’t know was that returning to high school that day would change my life. I stepped into Andy Bramante’s independent science research class at Greenwich High School, and I was riveted. The class had no textbooks, tests, or curriculum. Instead, kids work on individual science research projects throughout the year with the goal of taking them out on the global science fair circuit. (more…)

In November 2017, Penguin Random House hosted members of the Science Supervisors Association of New York City for a special luncheon. The day’s programming included keynote addresses from two of our authors: Andy Weir (The Martian, Artemis) and Rachel Swaby (Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science—and the World). Click below to watch videos of their speeches. (more…)

garbologyBy Elizabeth Grimaldi, English Teacher, Cranbury School 

To request a complimentary examination copy to review for classroom use, please contact us at K12education@edu.penguinrandomhouse.com or call us toll free at (844) 851-3955.

Not unexpectedly, the inspection of an individual’s garbage can reveal a great deal about a person, sometimes reveal otherwise hidden secrets, or even solve a crime. The study of the garbage produced by a group of people, by any account, can also help us to draw conclusions about that society and the values it holds. This premise propels the narrative of Edward Humes’ nonfiction book entitled Garbology: Our Dirty Little Love Affair with Trash. According to Humes, if the United States does not curb its excessive consumerism, and commit to a significant reduction in trash production, the country and world will be in grave peril. (more…)

9780804189354By Karen Kingrea, STEM Director at Immaculata Catholic School

Growing up outside Houston, Texas in the ’60s and ’70s, it is no surprise that I developed a love of space exploration and NASA. During my thirty-five years in education, I have furthered this passion whenever possible by attending NASA workshops and conference sessions across the country. Thus, it was with great excitement that I read The Martian by Andy Weir last summer. The book was everything I hoped it would be and more. My only regret was that it was not appropriate for my middle school students to read. I was pleasantly surprised, however, to learn that a classroom edition of The Martian exists. After seeing the movie as well, I knew that Mars would be our theme for the 2016–2017 school year. (more…)

9781101903544 (1)By Mike Massimino, author of Spaceman (Crown Archetype, October 2016).

When I was six years old, I watched Neil Armstrong walk on the moon and dreamed that one day I would follow in those historic footsteps. But as a working class kid who was skinny, awkward, nearsighted, and afraid of heights, I saw no path to becoming an astronaut. So my dream died by age eight, only to be rekindled after seeing the movie and reading the book The Right Stuff when I was a senior in college.

In my book, Spaceman, I encourage young people to never give up on big dreams. I take them through the struggles I overcame to get to space: pursuing an engineering degree, failing my PhD qualifying exam at MIT, being rejected by NASA three times before being accepted on the fourth try, and overturning a NASA medical disqualification by training my eyes to “see better.”  (more…)